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Hamptons Idea House


THE 2008 HC&G IDEA HOUSE

September 1, 2008

Living in Eternity
By Samuel T. Clover
Photographs by Eric Striffler

RESCUED FROM DEMOLITION AND RESTORED WITH A SPACIOUS MODERN ADDITION, THE 2008 HC&G IDEA HOUSE SHOWCASES THE LATEST IN ECO-FRIENDLY BUILDING AND DESIGN TECHNIQUES

Rescued from demolition and restored with a spacious modern addition, the 2008 Hamptons Cottages & Gardens Idea House, an 1860 Sagaponack farmhouse formerly owned by From Here to Eternity author James Jones, showcases the latest eco-friendly building and design techniques in a home of impeccable luxury. Built by developer ModernGreenHome in association with project architect Seth Howe, AIA, project manager Flavio Espinoza, HC&G Design Director Kyle Timothy Blood (of Kyle Timothy Home, LLC) and HC&G Editorial Director Barbara Dixon, the Idea House, open to the public in July and August, featured the visionary designs of 23 firms.

In many ways, the 2008 HC&G Idea House is an ongoing story—not only of the 3,000-square-foot Sagaponack farmhouse, once owned by the author James Jones and his wife, Gloria, that was restored and expanded with a new 3,300-square-foot modern addition. It's also a showcase of the latest in eco-friendly design and construction techniques, a category that continues to evolve almost daily as developers, builders, architects and designers seek better ways to reduce our carbon footprint while maintaining the highest standards of comfort and luxury. The story—or at least the most recent chapters of it—begins in May 2007, when Peter Sabbeth of ModernGreenHome first discovered the original 1860 farmhouse, which had been vacant for about three years and had fallen into disrepair. "It was slated to be knocked down, because it was pretty much derelict," Sabbeth says. After another developer backed out, ModernGreenHome took over. "We had a permit to knock it down but we gave it back to the town and said, 'No. The better thing to do is restore it and reuse everything there."

Working with design consultant Adam Facks, project manager Flavio Espinoza and project architect Seth Howe, Sabbeth added the modern addition along with a pool and pool house. He also restored a two-car garage and another outbuilding on the 1.5-acre lot. Partway through the design process, HC&G Idea House Design Director Kyle Timothy Blood of Kyle Timothy Home, LLC, came on board and edited the floor plans, lighting and electrical plans. Blood and HC&G Editorial Director Barbara Dixon chose a team of 23 design firms to decorate the home with a range of eco-friendly strategies, making the 2008 HC&G Idea House one of the greenest residences ever to rise in the Hamptons.

On the first floor of the five-bedroom, nine-bath house, the original front door leads into a stair hall linking the formal dining room, living room, library (where Jones worked) and powder room. Ahead, the first floor of the new addition features an expansive, glass-enclosed space containing the kitchen/casual dining area and family room, which are separated by a unique, three-story spiral staircase linking the lower level to a loft-like master bedroom suite on the second floor. The second floor of the original house boasts four additional bedrooms, each with its own en-suite bathroom. The lower level is home to entertainment and utility spaces including a media room, playroom, laundry room, gym, gym bathroom/steamshower, art gallery, cigar room and wine cellar. Outside, a terrace skirting the full length of the kitchen, casual dining area and family room extends into the eco-friendly landscaping, which includes the garage, a chemical-free gunite swimming pool, a pool house and an artist's studio. To conserve energy and resources, ModernGreenHome used cutting-edge building techniques and sustainable materials including lumber certified by the Forest Stewardship Council; concrete made from recycled aggregates and recycled sheetrock, flooring and tiles. A geothermal HVAC system provides heating and cooling for the house and pool. Roof-mounted photovoltaic laminates, almost invisible to the untrained eye, generate the majority of the house's electrical needs. All in all, it's green design for a luxurious lifestyle.

See the entire Idea House story by ordering a copy of the HC&G September 2008 issue.


The 2008 Idea House Architecture & Design Events As Seen in
HC&G Idea House Archive


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