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June 15-30, 2008 Cover
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ASID Industry Partner

June 15-30, 2008


EDITOR'S LETTER

Modern Times

Summer is definitely here—even though not technically on the calendar. And I have the distinct pleasure, yet again, of scouting wonderful projects for our issues. The weather is finally warm. What could be better than seeing homes and gardens at this time of year.

In this issue, we look at the rapidly expanding trend of building modern homes in the Hamptons. This is not to say there hasn't always been the modernists who have created architectural diversity here. The few early modernists just had to stand their ground to be recognized. But now it isn't just the shingle-style that holds its head up proudly.

New York Architect Lee Mindel gave me a wonderful present one Friday when he said we could publish his Southampton residence. I have always loved architecture and wanted to be an architect when I was just starting university. Even though I didn't go to school for this profession, I did have the good fortune to be the architecture editor at Architectural Digest for many years. When I stepped foot on his property and then toured the structure, it was like being in a candy store. I can't describe it but Lee and the writer, Lilli Darrow, and photographer Michael Moran have done it justice.

An architect I have indirectly known but never published is Bruce D. Nagel. His architecture is just what the East Hampton site owned by Carl and Louise Kane called for. And as Mindy Pantiel writes, (and photographer Elliott Kaufman captures), it is a match made in modernist heaven. This educated couple knew exactly what they wanted. Bruce still had them provide a detailed document on their desires and how they live. No stone was left unturned. Even their designer, Igal Toledano, made sure the architecture spoke for itself; the furnishings were designed for function and not to make a major statement.

When Marnie McBryde was looking for an architect to build a modern house that would take advantage of an East Hampton site she had always cherished, she came to Blaze Makoid. As she explains, "I wanted an architect who would be able to take advantage of the light and the views while having a California sensibility." The images by Marc Bryan-Brown tell the visual story so clearly. And writer Dale Burg recounts their relationship and the house's young history succinctly.

A house that combines shingle-style with a modernist element is our 2008 Idea House, open July 25 through August 24. You can go to our web site to see all the details before visiting us there yourself this summer. Till then...

Barbara L. Dixon
Editorial Director
barbara.dixon@hcandg.com

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