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October/November 2007


FEATURES

Italian Influence

(Page 2 of 2)

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The trio decided to increase the living area from 1,500 square feet to about 2,900, and divided the house into master and guest wings that are entirely separate, right down to the acoustics, air conditioning and heating. From the exterior, the wings appear distinctly divided: Between them, a glass—enclosed entranceway lets you look from the front steps straight through to the back yard, which was landscaped by Allen.

Originally from Holland, Hamaekers travels all over Europe to find pieces for his carefully curated furniture collection, which he exhibits at various design shows under the company name Secolo20. (He will be participating in the upcoming Modern Show in Manhattan from October 12-14.) Most of the items in the house are constructivist and modern, not decorative, he says. "You have to be able to read very clear lines in the furniture so you can see how pieces are joined together," he explains. "I like to see that they use high—quality materials. If that doesn't happen, it doesn't come in the house."

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So, what makes the cut? Pieces by T.H. Robsjohn—Gibbings, Sergio Rodrigues, Ico and Luisa Parisi and, of course, Ponti, outfit the living room while items by Joaquim Tenreiro and Florence Knoll fill the master bedroom. Nearby in the kitchen--a room Hamaekers uses often, as he likes to cook--black cerused—oak cabinetry provides a clean backdrop to a large island topped with white CaesarStone. (The countertop was cut wide enough to function as a workspace.) Most of the flooring in the house is bamboo.

The focus on Italian design continues in almost every room: In the entry, porcelain floor tiles from Italy look like natural stone while those in the baths mimic the look of zebrawood. Even the lighting--adjustable to create moods and highlight different surfaces--is Italian. The couple called on a friend, Los Angeles-based lighting designer Bruce Liebert, to help install cove lighting in the entry, living room and master bedroom, as well as black metal half—moon lighting outside.

"It was important to me that everything--furniture, color and lighting--would not compete with the house," Hamaekers says. Indeed, all of these elements come together so seamlessly that Ponti, Parisi and the other Italian masters Hamaekers admires may well have felt at home in the Wainscott woods.

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